Bellevue Veterinary Hospital, Parksville

Click-to-Call:
(250) 248-2031

  • Veterinary Clinic Open Every Day
    Open Seven Days a Week

    Your Complete Veterinary Team.

    We have 6 veterinarians on staff. And we have fully qualified technicians, experienced assistants, and friendly receptionists 8:30AM to 5:30PM, seven days a week. Our weekend availability is sure to fit your tight schedule.

  • Communication is the Bellevue Clinic's Top Priority


    Communication

    Being Clear and Direct is a Top Priority

    Because you know your pet's personality best, we always take great care to listen to your concerns, perform our necessary evaluation, and then communicate, in as clear a manner as possible, the best course of action for your pet. For us, it's a priority.

  • Veterinary Housecall Services, Parksville
    Housecall Services

    Veterinary Care Brought to Your Home.

    Our mobile service provides the highest level of convenience for you and your pet. Whether it is performing a check-up on your dog who is having mobility problems or paying a housecall to your anxious feline who hates the car ride, our mobile service provides quality care and comfort for both our human clients and their pets.

  • Veterinary Ultrasounds, x-Rays, Parksville, Qualicum
    Leading-Edge Technology

    On Site Diagnostics Available

    Since 1978, Bellevue Veterinary Hospital has been proud to remain at the forefront of veterinary best practice.

    As well as our on-site blood testing capabilities, we also have digital x-ray equipment (full size & dental), and ultrasound imaging available.

Welcome to the Bellevue Veterinary Hospital, Parksville, B.C.

Since 1978, Bellevue Veterinary Hospital has been proud to remain at the forefront of veterinary best practice in the Parksville, Qualicum Beach area. Our mobile service ensures the highest level of convenience for you and your pet. We have 5 veterinarians on staff. We've got fully qualified technicians and friendly receptionists 8:30AM to 5:30PM, seven days a week. We always take great care to listen to your concerns, perform our necessary evaluation, and then communicate, in as clear a manner as possible, the best course of action for your pet. For us, it's a top priority.

 
Bellevue Veterinary Hospital Video

Latest Bellevue News & Information

Pre-operative Considerations for Routine Surgeries

 

Routine surgeries are those procedures that are not urgent. There is no rush to have them done immediately.  (The word "routine" does not mean we don't take them seriously.  It just refers to the lack of urgency in timing.)  Examples are spaying & neutering, as well as most dental procedures. So, there’s time for you and your vet to think ahead, and consider some pre-operative options.  

This is NOT an "up-sell".  We just want you to know ahead what your options are.                                                  bellevue frame pre op blog

Here are some of those options you may be asked about at the time of your pet’s admission to our hospital for a surgical procedure.

1. Would you like to have pre-anesthetic blood work performed?

a. This is our way of having a glimpse into the health of your pet, beyond the physical exam.  The blood tests will reveal the numbers and condition of red and white blood cells, plus platelets (the blood clotting cells).  Also the chemistry portion of the panel demonstrates some hints into kidney & liver health, as well as blood sugar, proteins, and electrolytes.  These indices can guide our decision to go ahead with the anesthesia or not, and/or could alter which medications we'll choose for your pet.

2. Would you like to have an ID number tattooed into your pet’s (right) ear?

a. This procedure requires general anesthesia, so it’s only offered when we already know the patient is going to be heavily asleep for another procedure.
b. This ID# is a code, identifying the clinic at which the pet was spayed/neutered & tattooed, and it also indicates the year it was done, and the # of that patient within that year at that clinic.
c. It is a code that is recognizable throughout BC vet clinics and SPCAs.
d. A tattoo is an inexpensive, low-tech, easily evident identifier on your pet, if he/she is ever lost. 
e. There is minimal discomfort with this procedure.
f. Your contact information must be kept up-to-date at the clinic where your pet was tattooed (even if you don’t go to that clinic anymore).
g. Unfortunately, the code is less likely to be correctly interpreted outside of BC.

3. Would you like to have a microchip implanted in your pet?

a. This can be done at any time and doesn’t require general anesthesia, but it’s just easier for the pet if under anesthesia, so it can be considered at the time of another procedure.
b. The microchip is injected just under the skin, around the back of the neck between the shoulder blades, and has a number that can be revealed by a microchip reading device.
c. The number will be associated with your contact information that will be stored at a central database.  You have to keep your own contact information current (by communicating with the company web site for the microchip).
d. This will allow anyone (anywhere in the world) to find your contact information and inform you of your pet’s whereabouts, if your pet is found by someone who has access to a microchip reader/scanner.  (Vets & SPCAs & various other animal welfare organizations.)  
e. The disadvantage of microchips is – you need to have a microchip reader.  This isn’t a common piece of equipment outside of an animal care facility, so sometimes it’s not found that the pet has a microchip.
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